Tag Archives: Vesalius

Berengario da Carpi, pre-Vesalian anatomist (1460-1530)

Berengario da Carpi was the most important anatomist of the generation preceding the so-called Anatomical Trinity of Vesalius, Fallopio, and Eustachio. He is regarded as one of the founders of scientific anatomy, challenging the reliance on ancient texts and emphasizing the primacy of direct observation based on dissecting the human body. A prolific author, he […]

Juan Valdeverde de Amusco (1525-1588)

In the days before intellectual property laws (and when plagiarism was sometimes viewed as a compliment to the author) Juan Valverde of Spain wrote a book on anatomy so successful that it went through sixteen editions in four languages and its illustrations remain popular to this day. It was composed in 1556 and titled Anatomia […]

Andreas Vesalius: Wesel to Basel

Wyn Beasley Wellington, New Zealand   Leuven University in 1429 The Witing family—or Witjing or Witincx; spelling was capricious in those days—originated in Wesel, at the junction of the Rhine and Lippe rivers, and its members were court physicians. Peter is supposed to have attended the Emperor Frederik III, who reigned 1440-1493, and he translated […]

Vesalius: spirit of excellence and inquiry

JMS Pearce  United Kingdom   An image from De Fabrica This brief sketch is offered to commemorate the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius and the beginnings of post-Renaissance anatomy. Few men are more deserving of lasting fame than Vesalius. The prime importance of his anatomy is irrefutable. The current decline in anatomy teaching has provoked trenchant […]

Vesalius: the true face of anatomy

Donatella Lippi Florence, Italy Luigi Padeletti Florence, Italy   Copper plate paper from Remmelin’s Catoptrum by Lucas Killian New York Academy of Medicine The only unquestionably life-portrait of Vesalius’ is the wood-cut which finds its place in the frontispieces of both editions of the Fabrica1 in German and Latin editions of the Epitome,2 as well […]

Andreas Vesalius’ audience speaks out

Angela Belli Queens, New York, United States   Andreas Vesalius’ The Fabric of the Human Body marks not only a milestone in medical history but, by virtue of its extraordinary illustrations, offers ample evidence of medicine and art complementing each other. The frontispiece of the work, depicting an audience witnessing a dissection performed by Vesalius, […]

Surgeon’s hands in Vesalius’s portraits and Rembrandt’s The Anatomy Lesson of Dr. Tulp

Adéla Janíčková Prague, Czech Republic   Fig 1: Anon, Frontispiece, 1543. From Andreas Vesalius, De humani corporis fabrica libri septem, 1543 “To extol the human hand as a monument to God’s wisdom, an instrument that permits humans to create civilization” This statement by Dolores Mitchell1 describes the human hand as both a monument to divinity and […]