Tag Archives: nephrology

Fifty years on an Englishman recalls Cook County Hospital

Simon Cohen London   Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL In 1968 I was a senior registrar at a London teaching hospital. My ambition was to become a staff member at a major London institution and at that time one of the requirements was a qualification known as the BTA (Been to America).  My chief, probably […]

Dr. Willem J. Kolff: a great man

George Dunea Chicago, IL In Memoriam Willem J. Kolff: A great man   Willem Kolff, often called the father of the artificial kidney,died in January 2009, 3 days before his 98th birthday. During his long life he received numerous honors and accolades for his work. Many people thought he should have received the Nobel Prize, but as he once […]

There is a time

Joel L. Chinitz Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States   Vanitas, 1686 Adriaen Coorte, Dutch (1660–1707) Oil on canvas 19.72 × 16.3 in When the doors flew open, the noisy hoard—many in dirty, white jackets and floppy, bloodstained, green pants—circled the nurses’ station and overran the medical Intensive Care Unit. Wednesday renal rounds had begun. As two […]

The $84.77 Hospital – St. Vincent

Terri Sinnott Chicago, Illinois, United States    Bishop Francis Silas Marean Chatard What in the United States could be purchased with $87.44 in 1881?  In that year Bishop Francis Silas Marean Chatard and four Daughters of Charity1 took that sum and funded the first Catholic hospital in Indianapolis. Chatard had been born in 1834 in […]

Nephrology in 10 Steps

Andrew Bomback New York, United States     Photography by COMSALUD 1 I was seeing patients in clinic the morning my daughter was born. My wife called me to say that her contractions, relatively weak and infrequent when I had left home a few hours earlier, had suddenly picked up. She asked how quickly I […]

History of nephrology: beginnings

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Introduction In the second half of the 20th century nephrology became a fully-fledged specialty owing largely to the development of renal biopsy, dialysis, and kidney transplantation.1 Yet the seeds of these great advances were sown centuries earlier, based on the work and observations of scientists and clinicians dating […]

History of nephrology: the middle period

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Domenico Cotugno Coagulable urine Despite centuries of medical progress, the presence of abnormal amounts of albumin in the urine remains to this day the most sensitive and widely used indicator of renal disease. Described by Hippocrates as “bubbles on the surface of the urine” and known to medieval […]

History of nephrology: modern era

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Twentieth century Three major developments—renal biopsy, dialysis, and transplantation—revolutionized nephrology in the second half of the 20th century. Renal biopsy transformed the diagnostic approach to renal disease from a clinical methodology to one based on morphological analysis. Presently over one million patients with renal failure are maintained by […]

Domenico Cotugno (1736-1822)

Domenico Cotugno During a period of over 40 years Domenico Cotugno served as professor of anatomy at the University of Naples, one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the world, founded by the Holy Roman Emperor Frederic II in 1224. His academic career was marked by several important advances for which he is […]

Richard Bright, the father of nephrology

Two centuries will soon have passed since Richard Bright, of Guy’s Hospital, London, described the disease that came to bear his name. Within a few years of his original publication, the term Bright’s Disease became virtually synonymous with kidney disease—in England, Germany, France, and the United States. In its full-blown formulation it consisted of four […]