Tag Archives: Winter 2019

Resolution

Gaetan Sgro Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States   Looking Back: Vietnam War Memorial by Ann Stuurman. 2002. Windfield Photographic Collection, Ontario Canada. noun 1. an expression of will or intent; a commitment In June 1965, Edward White, one of two astronauts aboard the Gemini IV mission, becomes the first American to walk in space. He floats […]

Sign Gene: the first deaf superhero film

Paul Dakin North London, United Kingdom   Sign Gene, the world’s first deaf superhero film. Written and directed by Emilio Insolera. Image published with permission. If the superhero genre really is “about transformation, about identity, about difference,”1 then the description can readily be applied to Sign Gene, the world’s first deaf superhero film. Written and […]

The language game of medicine

Gunjan Sharma Devon, United Kingdom   Photo by Ludomił on Unsplash “The arrow points only in the application that a living being makes of it.” – Ludwig Wittgenstein1   The Language Game Language is a fascinating concept when viewed through a philosophical lens. Imagine if we no longer had a word for jealousy. Would that […]

Gifts of gratitude

Henry Bair Palo Alto, California, United States   Christ sits at the bedside of Jairus’s sickening daughter. Etching after G.C. von. Max. Credit: Wellcome Collection. CC BY “It’s for you,” the old man said when his niece tried to hand Dr. Alba the large wrapped package. It was a gesture I was familiar with, though Dr. Alba […]

A column of volcanic sand

David Gullette Boston, Massachusetts, United States   The original all-concrete BioSand Filters we made for many years. 330 lbs without its sand. Why shouldn’t a retired English professor devote himself to Public Health? I fell hard for Nicaragua in the 1980s, organizing Boston academics against Contra aid, visiting the country in 1986 with Father Steve […]

Michelangelo’s David and the anatomical politics of religious art

Sam Shuster Woodbridge, Suffolk   David. Michelangelo. 1501-4, Florence It is impossible to see Michelangelo’s David without marvelling at the way its power and humanity have been fashioned from coarse stone. Apart from its living warmth, there is a unique display of human anatomy, each feature of which stands out in perfection, and together make […]

Un-Impostering

Brianna Rossiter Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA   Children Playing with a Mask by John Smith. After Balthazar van Lemens. 1703. Philadelphia Museum of Art. We stood surrounding her tiny body in the hospital bed. Her shallow breaths were splinted by pain as we watched, myself and four second-year, male medical students. Her breath would catch and […]

Lessons learned from the Greeks: The physician-patient relationship in Hippocratic Gynecology

Jenna Nickas New Brunswick, NJ, USA   Sanctuary of Asclepius, Epidaurus, Greece. June 8, 2013 (photo taken by Jenna, on her 21st birthday) The medical treatment of women in Classical Greece was a topic not overlooked by the Hippocratic tradition. Much of the Corpus addresses the health of women, especially Epidemics and Diseases of Women. […]

The gout of the Medici

Florence in the fifteenth century was one of the most important cities in Western Europe. Rich and resplendent, first in banking and in the wool trade, it even issued its own currency, the golden florin, widely used throughout Europe. For some three hundred years the city was ruled almost continuously by the Medici, at one […]

Alice Hamilton: physician and scientist of the dangerous trades

Anne Jacobson Oak Park, Illinois, United States   Alice Hamilton in 1919 It is a gritty, frozen day in winter-weary Chicago, one that does little to inspire action; perhaps least of all a frigid walk around the salty, potholed neighborhood. In a month or two a lunchtime walk would be a welcome idea; university students […]