Tag Archives: 20th century

“My dear neoplasm:” Sigmund Freud’s oral cancer

James L. Franklin Chicago, Illinois, United states   Sigmund Freud circa 1921. Photo by Max Halberstadt. Via Wikimedia. Public domain. When the founder of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud, died in London early on the morning of September 23, 1939, he succumbed to what he wryly referred to as “my dear old cancer with which I have […]

International adoption of Greek “orphans”

Howard Fischer Uppsala, Sweden   Child refugees from Macedonia, Greece, 1948. Retouched from the original held by the State Archives of the Republic of Macedonia (DARM). Via Wikimedia. No known restrictions on publication or modification. “He’s only a pawn in their game.”1 – Bob Dylan   Between 1950 and 1962, 3,200 Greek children were adopted […]

“All hands to dance and skylark!” – Shipboard dancing in the British Navy

Richard de Grijs Sydney, Australia   Figure 1. Warspite cadets dancing the Hornpipe, 1928. National Maritime Museum Reproduction ID H6381. Associated Press on Flickr. Via Wikimedia. Public domain. “We were all hearty seamen, no cold did we fear; And we have from all sickness entirely kept clear; Thanks be to the Captain he has proved so […]

Tattoos in the twentieth century

Howard Fischer Uppsala, Sweden   “It was in 1972 and you didn’t really go around showing tattoos or talking about them… And now all of a sudden it has become the thing to do.”1 – Cher, American singer, actor   Sailor being tattooed by a fellow sailor aboard USS New Jersey in 1944. Photo by […]

Ben Hecht and the “Miracle of the Fifteen Murderers”

James L. Franklin Chicago, Illinois, United States   “Miracle of the Fifteen Murderers: The X Club holds a post-mortem“ by Ben Hecht. Collier’s Weekly, January 16, 1943, pp. 11–12, via The Unz Review. Fair use. The January 16, 1943 issue of Collier’s Weekly featured a short story by the famous and multifaceted author Ben Hecht […]

Jorge Luis Borges: Brilliant blindness

Nicolas Roberto Robles Badajoz, Spain   Penumbra de la paloma llamaron los hebreos a la iniciación de la tarde cuando la sombra no entorpece los pasos y la venida de la noche se advierte como una música esperada y antigua, como un grato declive. Twilight of the dove the Hebrews called the initiation of the […]

Henry Miller

JMS Pearce Hull, England   Henry Miller. From the author’s personal collection. There are many eminent figures in the worlds of medicine and neurology, most of them distinguished by their clinical skill, academic prowess, scientific originality, or success in establishing major institutes of teaching and research. Henry Miller (1913–1976), though not a laboratory investigator, was […]

Arthur William Mayo-Robson

JMS Pearce Hull, England, United Kingdom   Figure 1. Arthur William Mayo-Robson. Photogravure. Wellcome Images via Wikimedia. Public domain. Arthur William Robson (1853–1933) (Fig 1) was born the son of a chemist John Bonnington Robson, in Filey, a popular Yorkshire seaside resort.1 He later added Mayo to his surname. He is reported as attending Wesley […]

Long before Pearl Harbor, an entire hospital was sent to help England in World War II

Edward Tabor Bethesda, MD, United States   An Allied convoy underway in the Atlantic Ocean near Iceland. Photo c. 1942. National Archives and Records Administration via Wikimedia. Public domain. Harvard University President James B. Conant had the idea of sending a fully staffed hospital to England to help the British in their war with Germany […]

Marmite: Its place in medical history, Lucy Wills, and the discovery of folic acid

James L. Franklin Chicago, Illinois, United States   Marmite – Photograph taken by the author, April 2022, in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. On a recent visit to Botswana in southern Africa, the author was introduced to a food spread known as Marmite.* Apparently very popular in Africa, a distinctive jar of this condiment was present […]