Tag Archives: Winter 2016

Wilson’s disease on television

Michelle Muscat Msida, Malta   The television series Scrubs, created by Bill Lawrence, is a popular medical comedy that follows the hospital adventures of the main protagonist Dr. John “J.D.” Dorian (Zach Braff) as well as other hospital staff employed at Sacred Heart. The TV series spans numerous seasons and hence features several episodes introducing […]

The middle finger: identity crisis in the emergency room

Lara Bazelon San Francisco, California, United States   I am a lawyer who writes. I write about the criminal justice system, single parenting, divorce, and I am also an aspiring novelist. I had always written, scribbling in diaries as a little kid, writing early in the morning before I went to work or on the […]

Maude Abbott and the early rise of pediatric cardiology

Göran Wettrell Lund University, Sweden   In December 1898 Dr. Maude Elizabeth Abbott, assistant curator at the medical museum of McGill University in Canada, was sent to study museums and other institutions in Washington, D.C. In Baltimore she met Dr. William Osler, professor of medicine and one of the founders of the Johns Hopkins Medical […]

Edgar Allan Poe – a tormented literary genius

Donna Olson Whitelaw, Alberta Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1849 A man attempts to hide from his sins and ultimately from himself. A murderer takes an old man’s life and hides the body under the floorboards. But he cannot silence his guilt, so he keeps on hearing the dead man’s heart in his room. This story is […]

The Lady Writer and the Valkyrie: Magda Szabo’s novel The Door

Carol Levine New York, New York, United States   Mixed media painting “Nickels and Dimes I” by Natalie Avondet. Used by permission of the artist. An old woman desperately needs medical attention. Yet she fiercely refuses every offer of help from friends, neighbors, and the local doctor. No one will get past her door, she vows. […]

Shepherd with a goiter

Sally Metzler Chicago, Illinois, United States  Nativity Moretto da Brescia Detail of Nativity Moretto da Brescia This beautiful scene of the Nativity by Moretto da Brescia (c. 1498-1554) in the Santa Giulia Museum of his native town is painted in muted autumnal colors of gold, browns, and greens. On the right the ox and the ass […]

A painful but tender embrace: Robert Pope’s Aesculapius

Caroline Wellbery Washington, DC, United States     Aesculapius Robert Pope (1956-1992) Charcoal on paper, 184 x 80.7 cm, 1991 Robert Pope, early in childhood a student gifted in science, chose art as his career, and no one better melds the observing eye with the understanding heart. The shadow of cancer hung over him during […]

Obesity and art

Bojana Cokić Zajecar, Serbia   Obesity is the oldest and most common metabolic disorder of humans, as shown even by the sculptures of ancient civilizations, the Greek caryatids, and Egyptian sphinxes and mummies. Many artists have painted it on their canvases as seen through the prism of their artistic eye and in accordance with the […]

A Night with Venus, a lifetime with Mercury: syphilis among the British aristocracy in William Hogarth’s marriage à-la-mode

Sally Metzler Chicago, Illinois, USA   Fig. 1: William Hogarth The Inspection, from Marriage A-la-Mode ca. 1743, National Gallery, London. William Hogarth’s famous series Marriage à-la-mode parodies English society, particularly their arranged marriages and often dissolute lifestyle. He peppered his satire of upper-class matrimony with a moralizing tone and made clear visual references to syphilis and […]

Art and Medicine

JMS Pearce East Yorks, England   Art has been said to deepen compassion for suffering.1 Paintings have been interpreted as “metaphors for human feelings . . . they are nonliteral symbols of the inner life.”2 Paintings trigger emotions and insights, “generating associations and tapping new, different, or deeper levels of meaning.”3 It is inherent in all […]