Tag Archives: Padua

Book Review: Medicine in the Middle Ages

Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, United Kingdom   Cover of Medicine in the Middle Ages. Juliana Cummings. In the history of Western Europe, the Middle Ages refers to the period between the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century through the beginning of the Renaissance in the 1500s. These thousand years were characterized by […]

Salernitan women

Vicent Rodilla Alicia López-Castellano Valencia, Spain   Figure 1. A miniature from Avicenna’s Canon representing the Salernitan Medical School. Source The first medical school in the Western world is thought to be the Schola Medica Salernitana (Figure 1), which traces its origins to the dispensary of an early medieval monastery.1 The medical school at Salerno […]

Charles-Michel Billard, an overlooked pediatric pioneer

Stanford Shulman Chicago, Illinois   Fig. 1 N Corvisart, F.X Bichat, and Rene Laennec are each shown on a commemorative postage stamp of France. From the author’s collection of medical history stamps. Introduction During the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries medicine transitioned into a more science-based discipline. This was primarily the result of gross […]

Adrianus Spigelius, the last great Paduan anatomist

In his time the Flemish physician Adrianne van den Spiegel (often referred to by the latinized name of Adrianus Spigelius) was the most renowned practicing clinician in the city of Padua. An accomplished anatomist, he was left with only meager eponymous pickings: the caudate (Spigelian) lobe of the liver and some more obscure structures around […]

In pursuit of a new anatomy

Roseanne F. Zhao Chicago, Illinois, United States   (Left) Standing figure–muscle plate from De humani corporis fabrica, libri septum, Basile: 1543 by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) (Right) The bones, muscles and tendons of the hand, c.1510-11–pen and ink with wash, over black chalk, 28.8 x 20.2cm, from Anatomical Manuscript A by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519). The […]