Tag Archives: Hungary

Budapest: medicine and paprika

L. J. Sandlow George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   The Magyars, ancestors of modern Hungarians, came from the region of the Ural Mountains and invaded Europe around AD 800. Crossing the Carpathian Mountains, they conquered the Pannonian plain and established a large and important medieval kingdom. In 1526 they were defeated at the decisive […]

Washing our hands

Anthony Papagiannis Thessaloniki, Greece   Winter Sunshine, Halkidiki, Greece. Photo by the author Ever since Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor of Judea, washed his hands before condemning Jesus Christ to death by crucifixion, this simple act of personal sanitation has been used as the figurative icon of a disclaimer, the denial of responsibility. Today, in […]

Saint Elisabeth, a saintly nurse

Saint Elisabeth of Hungary bringing food for the inmates of a hospital (Wellcome Collection). Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. Coloured engraving by W. Langhammer.  Wellcome Collection. CC BY.   Saint Elizabeth of Hungary (1207–1231) is one of the most loved saints of the Middle Ages. Also called St. Elizabeth of Thuringia, she is the patron of bakers, beggars, brides, […]

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who is the fairest of them all?: Erzsébet Báthory and the curative power of blood in medieval Europe

Joanna Smolenski New York, United States If the body is seen either as enclosed and filled with blood, or as vulnerable and bleeding, then blood can also only be interpreted either as life (when it fills the intact body) or as death (when it has left the body). (Bildhauer 2006: 5) In medieval Europe, blood […]

Aging in (another) place: Magda Szabo’s novel Iza’s Ballad

Carol Levine New York, NY, United States   Imprint II. Copyright 2017 Kelsey Hochstatter Represented by Third and Wall Art Group LLC, Seattle WA In Hungary in the early 1960s, Izabella (Iza) Szöcs is a physician, and a very good one, according to her patients and peers. Her specialty is rheumatology, but she makes “notes […]