Tag Archives: Edgar Allen Poe

A picture of ill-health: the illness of Elizabeth Siddal

Emily Boyle Dublin, Ireland   Fig. 1 Ophelia, Sir John Everett Millais 1851-2, Tate Britain, London It is difficult to think of Ophelia, one of Shakespeare’s most famous characters, without bringing to mind the famous depiction of her by John Everett Millais. In Hamlet, the sensitive and fragile Ophelia is driven mad by grief after […]

Poe’s Consumptive Paradox

Gregory Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, USA   Tuberculosis may have killed more people than any pathogen in history1  leaving an array of terrible stigmata whenever it extinguished life. The essential image of tuberculosis in the  eighteenth century was that of foul decay.2 Morgagni vividly described the road to a consumptive death as, “(she) threw up pus […]

Edgar Allen Poe and The Masque of the Red Death

The Masque of the Red Death by Abigail Larson The “Red Death” had long devastated the country. No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous. Blood was its Avatar and its seal—the redness and the horror of blood. There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleeding at the pores, with […]

The first experiment

Filip Šimunović Germany   Sebastijan’s first independent animal experiment at Harvard transpired in the manner of something Edgar Poe could have written—if he knew anything about animal experiments and stereotactic neurosurgery at his time. Sebastijan, however, wasn’t there to read about it, or to write about it. He was there to survive it. He started […]

Edgar Allan Poe – a tormented literary genius

Donna J. A. Olson Whitelaw, Alberta Edgar Allan Poe, 1809-1849 A man attempts to hide from his sins and ultimately from himself. A murderer takes an old man’s life and hides the body under the floorboards. But he cannot silence his guilt, so he keeps on hearing the dead man’s heart in his room. This […]