Hektoen International

A Journal of Medical Humanities

Tag: Arpan Banerjee

  • John Keats statue

    Arpan K. BanerjeeSolihull, England John Keats, born in London in 1795, is one of the finest Romantic poets of the English language. He died at the age of twenty-five in Rome, where he had gone to recover from tuberculosis. The house where he spent the last years of his life, at the base of the…

  • Book review: Meeting the Challenge: Top Women in Science

    Arpan K. BanerjeeSolihull, United Kingdom Women have long faced difficulties in acceptance to scientific fields. Science today remains male-dominated, but there are more examples of brilliant female scientists who have broken through the so-called glass ceiling. In her preface to Meeting the Challenge, Magdolna Hargittai illustrates this point with the 2020 Chemistry Nobel Prize winners,…

  • Book review: Sir Thomas Browne: The Opium of Time

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, UK   Cover of Sir Thomas Browne: The Opium of Time by Gavin Francis Sir William Osler was a great admirer of Sir Thomas Browne’s 1643 Religio Medici, one of his favorite books and on his recommended reading list for medical men. Browne influenced many writers, such as Samuel Johnson, WG…

  • Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen and X-rays

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, England   Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen. LIFE Photo Archive. Via Wikimedia. The name Röntgen will be familiar to most for his discovery of X-rays on November 8, 1895. This date is now celebrated as the International Day of Radiology. Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen was born in Lennep, Germany on March 27, 1845. The…

  • Book review: The Story of the Brain in 10 1/2 Cells

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, United Kingdom   Cover of The Story of the Brain in 10 1/2 Cells by Richard Wingate The brain is arguably the most complex organ in the human body, containing more than 100 billion neurons. In this new book, neuroscientist Richard Wingate sets out to describe different types of brain cells,…

  • Book review: Pathogenesis: How Germs Made History

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, UK   Cover of Pathogenesis: How Germs Made History by Jonathan Kennedy I do not use superlatives lightly, but this is an extraordinary book. It is ambitious in scope and seeks to describe the progress of humanity from earliest times with an emphasis on the role of infectious diseases in our…

  • Book review: Pandemic Obsession: How They Feature in our Popular Culture

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, UK   Cover of Pandemic Obsession: How They Feature in Our Popular Culture by Stephen Basdeo. Following the worldwide COVID pandemic, there has been a plethora of books published on the theme of epidemics and pandemics. Readers may be forgiven if they feel they are now suffering from literary pandemic fatigue.…

  • Book review: A History of Insanity and the Asylum

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, UK   Cover of A History of Insanity and the Asylum by Juliana Cummings. Mental health topics have long been a source of fascination. In this new book, author Juliana Cummings explores the history of insanity and asylums from the Middle Ages to the modern era, revealing the sometimes-shocking treatment of…

  • Book review: My Years with the British Red Cross

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, United Kingdom   Cover of My Years with The British Red Cross: A Chief Executive Reflects by Sir Nick Young. The Red Cross is known worldwide as a great humanitarian achievement. The charity was founded by Swiss businessman Henri Dunant, who was moved by the lack of care available to people who…

  • Book review: A History of Women in Medicine and Medical Research

    Arpan K. Banerjee Solihull, UK   Cover of A History of Women in Medicine and Medical Research: Exploring the Trailblazers of STEM by Dale DeBakcsy Research and writing on women’s contributions to science and medicine are needed and welcome. Books about science and medical advances have often concentrated primarily on men’s achievements and have a…