Tag Archives: Gregory W. Rutecki

Did Casimir Pulaski have 21-hydroxylase deficiency?

Gregory W. Rutecki Lyndhurst, Ohio, United States   Casimir Pulaski, from the Great Generals series (N15) for Allen & Ginter Cigarettes Brands. Allen & Ginter. 1888. Metropolitan Museum of Art. “. . . I could not submit to stoop before the sovereigns of Europe, so I came to hazard all the freedom of America, and […]

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LATIN AMERICA Published in September, 2019 H E K T O R A M A   . AFRICAN AMERICAN MEDICAL PIONEERS The first hospital in the Americas was built by Fray Nicolás de Ovando from 1503 to 1508 in Hispaniola (Dominican Republic and Haiti). Named Hospital de San Nicolás de Bari (I), it was located in […]

Rosencrantz, Guildenstern, and their doctor are dead

Joshua Niforatos Gregory Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, United States   ROSENCRANTZ: “Whatever became of the moment when one first knew about death? There must have been one, a moment, in childhood when it first occurred to you that you don’t go on forever. It must have been shattering – stamped into one’s memory. And yet, I […]

Retirement reflections: from code to compassion with Chloe

Gregory W. Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, USA   Daphnis & Chloe, by Henry Woods, R.A William May and Samuel Shem have described inadequacies of doctor-patient relationships that are characterized as code models.1,2 May observed that these medical codes binding patients and their physicians together shape relationships similar to habits or rules, are aesthetic, and value style over […]

From bedside to bench and beyond: the legacy of Dr. Eric G.L. Bywaters

Joshua D. Niforatos and Gregory W. Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, USA    E.G.L. Bywaters. University of British Columbia, Open Collections The historian John Lukacs, a contemporary of pioneering British physician Eric G. L. Bywaters (1910-2003), wrote in his book At the End of an Age that “the history of anything amounts to that thing itself.”1 Lukacs, influenced by […]

Is Daddy a good doctor?

Gregory W Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio   Tears at Calling Hours George Lundberg posed an intriguing question for a generation of physicians: why don’t more doctors go to the funerals or calling hours of their patients?1 In fact, he boldly predicted that the only funeral you can be sure your physician will attend will be that of his […]

Consumption and vampires: metaphor and myth before science

Gregory W. Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, United States   Illustrations of vampires. Provided by Author.       “In New England . . . It is believed that consumption is not a physical but a spiritual disease . . . as long as the body of a dead consumptive relative has blood in its heart it […]

Art, Cristobal Rojas, and tuberculosis: a Latin American cultural experience

Maria S. Landaeta Aldo L. Schenone Gregory W. Rutecki   Fig. 1: Self portrait by Rojas, (1887) [public domain] Tuberculosis, the “captain of all these men of death,” has devastated diverse societies for thousands of years. How are experiences related to this unforgiving and seemingly insatiable disease made unique by their cultural contexts? The visual […]

Abbott Handerson Thayer’s art and fin de siècle American culture

Gregory W. Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, USA Fig. 1: Self Portrait, 1898 Abbott Handerson Thayer Snite Museum of Art, United States Abbott Handerson Thayer (1849-1921) straddled the fin de siècle, and with his brush preserved an American counterculture for posterity. His variegated oeuvre reflects substantive reflections of his period’s medical and religious culture, as well as […]

When the sensory lens is an artistic prism: the brain, Kandinsky, and multisensory art

Gregory W. Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio, United States     Wassily Kandinsky seated before one of his paintings In 1812 an Austrian physician named Georg Sachs published a medical dissertation about his family’s albinism.1,2 Conspicuous by inclusion, Sachs claimed to simultaneously hear and see colored music. His claim of a sensory duality is considered the first […]