Tag Archives: Winter 2013

Gregor goes to the doctor

Larry Zaroff Palo Alto, California, USA Photography by Anthony Kai C My clinic is far North in Acres, Montana, perversely, a small town near the Canadian border, where, in October, without permission the dark sneaks in early. My work here, after twenty-six years as a cardiac surgeon in Los Angeles, is the way I want […]

Pediatric pishogues

C. Anthony Ryan Bridget Maher Cork, Ireland   Illustration by John Bauer Although superstitions abound in all societies, Irish tradition has an especially long and rich tradition of folk beliefs and superstitions. Thus, when a newborn infant was recently diagnosed with Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome,1 a triad of port-wine stain, varicose veins, and hypertrophy, his mother burst […]

Guillain–Barré – Vanishing Twin

John A. Vanek, MD St. Petersburg, Florida, USA Poet’s statement: Poetry provides a vehicle that takes me to places that logic won’t go, a way of understanding the incomprehensible, both in life and in medicine. I now prescribe poetry PRN, but warn that it may hurt a little. My poems are peopled with my family, […]

Gregor goes to the doctor

Larry Zaroff, MD, PhD Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States   Photography by Anthony Kai C My clinic is far North in Acres, Montana, perversely, a small town near the Canadian border, where, in October, without permission the dark sneaks in early. My work here, after twenty-six years as a cardiac surgeon in Los […]

Pediatric pishogues

C. Anthony Ryan, MB, MD, FRCPI Bridget Maher MB, MRCGP University College Cork, Ireland   Illustration by John Bauer Although superstitions abound in all societies, Irish tradition has an especially long and rich tradition of folk beliefs and superstitions. Thus, when a newborn infant was recently diagnosed with Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber syndrome,1 a triad of port-wine stain, […]

The Royal London Hospital

Peter D. Hart Chicago, Illinois, United States    The Royal London Hospital, 2007 The Royal London Hospital, known as The London, is one of the largest and busiest hospitals in England and has an international reputation for excellence in many fields of medicine and dentistry. It was founded in 1740, at a time when London […]

Edgar Allen Poe and The Masque of the Red Death

The Masque of the Red Death by Abigail Larson The “Red Death” had long devastated the country. No pestilence had ever been so fatal, or so hideous. Blood was its Avatar and its seal—the redness and the horror of blood. There were sharp pains, and sudden dizziness, and then profuse bleeding at the pores, with […]

Doctor and dictionary

For almost two decades beginning in 1882, Dr. William Chester Minor, retired army surgeon and captain of the Union Army during the American Civil War, labored unceasingly, day after day, reading and researching sixteenth and seventeenth century books, making notes on more than 12,000 slips of paper, and mailing them to the Scriptorium of Dr. […]

The last illness of Père Goriot

“It is all up with him, or I am much mistaken! Something very extraordinary must have taken place; he looks to me as if he were in imminent danger of serous apoplexy. The lower part of his face is composed enough, but the upper part is drawn and distorted. Then there is that peculiar look […]

The doctor as writer (William Carlos Williams)

William Carlos Williams, 1921   “[Some people] naïvely ask him, ‘How do you do it? How can you carry on an active business like that and at the same time find time to write? You must be superhuman. You must have at the very least the energy of two men.’ But they do not grasp […]