Tag Archives: Spring 2014

Book review: The stomach – a biography by Jeremy Hugh Baron

 James L. Franklin Chicago, Illinois, United States Jeremy Hugh Baron, a well-lettered physician, scientist, and scholar takes us through a comprehensive tour of the “The Stomach” in recorded history. It is immediately apparent that Dr. Baron is not limiting himself to the anatomical organ, but to what the patient suffering from abdominal distress perceives to […]

Leonardo and the reinvention of anatomy

Salvatore Mangione Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA   When Vesalius started his life journey five hundred years ago, Leonardo Da Vinci’s own journey into the human body was symbolically coming to an end. Denounced by a German collaborator for necromancy, he would eventually be barred by the Church from even entering the Ospedale di Santo Spirito under […]

In pursuit of a new anatomy

Roseanne F. Zhao Chicago, Illinois, United States   (Left) Standing figure–muscle plate from De humani corporis fabrica, libri septum, Basile: 1543 by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) (Right) The bones, muscles and tendons of the hand, c.1510-11–pen and ink with wash, over black chalk, 28.8 x 20.2cm, from Anatomical Manuscript A by Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519). The […]

Vesalius: spirit of excellence and inquiry

JMS Pearce  United Kingdom   An image from De Fabrica This brief sketch is offered to commemorate the 500th birthday of Andreas Vesalius and the beginnings of post-Renaissance anatomy. Few men are more deserving of lasting fame than Vesalius. The prime importance of his anatomy is irrefutable. The current decline in anatomy teaching has provoked trenchant […]

Bidloo and Ruysch: anatomy and art in the 17th century Netherlands

Elisabeth Brander St. Louis, Missouri, United States   Fig 1.Still Life with Lobster and Fruit, c. 1650. Abraham van Beyeren The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Of the many distinguished anatomists who worked in the Netherlands during the European Enlightenment, Frederick Ruysch and Govard Bidloo were the two most remarkable. They were contemporaries and aware of […]

William Alcott and the cultural meaning of medical knowledge in the nineteenth century

Catherine Mas Chicago, Illinois, USA   Alcott, The House I Live in, 21 William Alcott (1798-1859) thought of himself as a medical missionary. He devoted most of his life’s work to spreading the nascent knowledge of anatomy and physiology infused with the message of Christian fulfillment. As a reformer and author of over 100 books, […]