Tag Archives: Peter H. Berczeller

Becoming a doctor in Chicago (c.1954)—The Chicago Maternity Center

Peter H. Berczeller Edited by Paul Berczeller An excerpt from Dr. Peter Berczeller’s memoir, The Little White Coat.   Image by Stephanie Pratt from Pixabay My group and I were assigned to the Chicago Maternity Center at the end of the obstetrics in November 1955. Despite the recent training at Michael Reese, nothing could have prepared me for […]

Becoming a doctor in Chicago (c.1954)—Clerkships at Michael Reese Hospital

Peter H. Berczeller Edited by Paul Berczeller An excerpt from Dr. Peter Berczeller’s memoir, The Little White Coat.   Michael Reese Hospital. Postcard by Curt Teich. 1950. No known copyright for Curt Teich postcards printed before 1964. After Cook County, my group and I moved over to Michael Reese Hospital—a pile of old buildings on the […]

Becoming a doctor in Chicago (c.1954)—The Chicago Medical School

Peter H. Berczeller Edited by Paul Berczeller An excerpt from Dr. Peter Berczeller’s memoir, The Little White Coat.   Compound monocular microscope. Graduated grey background. Credit: Science Museum, London. CC BY Chicago Med was the poor relation among the medical schools ringing Cook County Hospital. The sooty three-story building was dwarfed by the high rises of […]

Learning anatomy in medical school

Peter H. Berczeller Dordogne, France   Dissection An excerpt from Dr. Peter Berczeller’s memoir, “The Little White Coat.”   On the second day of medical school, we were invited to meet the cadaver we would be working on for the next six months. I trooped up with the rest of the class into a large […]

Saul Farber on St. Helena

Peter H. Berczeller Dordogne, France     Portrait of Saul Farber I went to see Saul Farber in his new office in the spring of 2000. For some forty years he had been our chief, our role model, the long-term creative force behind the department of medicine and indeed the entire medical school, the man […]

The morning ritual

Peter H. Berczeller Dordogne, France   Years ago, I heard the adage: “When you get up in the morning, and you don’t see your name in the Times obituaries, you’re good for another day.” I was young then, with no understanding of the seriousness beneath this seemingly witty remark. As a medicine resident, I was no […]