Tag Archives: Winter 2014

Scarification: harmful cultural practice or vehicle to higher being?

Kenneth Michael Felsenstein National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States (Winter 2014) Scarification is the act of “covering, disguising and transforming the body”1 by creating wounds in one’s own flesh in order to cause indelible markings. It is perhaps one of the most misunderstood body modification procedures done today, largely perceived in Western society as a […]

Healing through laughter

Farrah Bui Princeton University, New Jersey, United States (Winter 2014) Laughing boy, c. 1625 Frans Hals Royal Picture Gallery Mauritshuis, The Hague “If there is one thing to know about me, it’s that I refuse to ever eat honey again,” Ben explains to the audience. Immediately, looks of confusion and raised eyebrows appear among the […]

Life at the table

Isabel Azevedo, MD, PhD Universidade do Porto, Portugal Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry, 1412 – 1416 Herman, Paul, and Johan Limbourg Musée Condé, France In the days when human time was organized differently and every hour had its meaning, meals were community events, mostly family events, where people met to socialize as well […]

The unloved gut

Fergus Shanahan, MD University College Cork, Ireland “My brain, it’s my second favorite organ” pronounced Woody Allen.1 For many, it is the seat of the soul, the source of creativity and much more, whereas the heart represents passion, courage, and character. Fondness for other organs relates to warmth and honesty in the eyes, clarity in […]

Children do not die

Matko Marusic University of Split, Croatia (Winter 2014) Photography by S GLeisner Josip was just one of the boys who lived in our street, but to me he was and still is especially important. It was through him that I, for the first time, encountered an incurable disease; he was the first person I wanted […]