Tag Archives: Summer 2017

Antonio Scarpa, anatomist (1752-1832)

  Students graduating from a university not uncommonly leave and seek employment elsewhere, but by the excellence of their work attain great fame and as such repay their alma mater for their early education. This was the case of Antonio Scarpa. Entering the University of Padua at age fifteen, he studied under the famous Battista […]

Manga as medical critique

Adil Menon Cleveland, Ohio   Osama Tezuka 1951 “Godfather of Manga” Stark lines are often drawn in American and European literature between graphic novels, which cater primarily to adults, and comics, which despite their broad appeal are perceived as being meant for younger audiences.  No such dichotomy exists within the Japanese medium of manga, an […]

In a scan, darkly

Anthony Papagiannis Thessaloniki, Greece   Every so often I browse through old patient records and before committing them to the shredder I read through the histories they contain. These visits to the past are useful and edifying, allowing a more detached consideration of the events. Has something changed in medical knowledge since then? Do the […]

Doctor bites policeman in Chicago religious dispute

St. Volodmyr and  Olha Cathedral The episode took place in Chicago about half a century ago. At the time some 100,000 Ukrainians lived in the greater Chicago area, mostly in a near-west neighborhood referred to as the Ukrainian village. They were mostly (c.70%) Catholics of the Byzantine or Eastern rite, adhering to the old Julian […]

Anatomical fugitive sheets revived: medical history as a stimulant for active learning and reflection

Goran Štrkalj and William Hunt Sydney, Australia   Figure 1. An anatomical fugitive sheet created by Jacob Frohlich in 1544 (Image source: Wellcome Library, London, CC BY 4.0). Anatomy has traditionally been one of the foundation disciplines within the medical curricula.1 At the same time, it has been one of the most challenging subjects, both […]

Life of a blanket in the medical center

Fredna DeCarlo Missouri City, Texas, USA   I am fresh and new, without the scent of laundry detergent yet, waiting on the shelf to begin my life as a blanket in the Medical Center. Here we go! I feel hands that are smooth, their owner is in a hurry, but suddenly she slows, her mannerisms […]

Katherine Anne Porter and the 1918 Influenza Epidemic

Cristóbal S. Berry-Cabán Fort Bragg, NC   Fig 1. Katherine Anne Porter.  Photograph taken in Mexico, 1930. In Pale Horse, Pale Rider, Katherine Anne Porter weaves the horrors of the Great War, the 1918 influenza pandemic, and the near-death experience of a young woman in love with a doomed American soldier into a memorable novella.1 […]

Classicism and Sir Charles Bell’s Engravings of the Nerves

Allister Neher Montreal, Quebec, Canada   Charles Bell, A Series of Engravings, Explaining the Course of the Nerves Readers of medical humanities journals have become accustomed to seeing articles on anatomical illustration and its indebtedness to the techniques and conventions of the fine arts. As diverse as connections between these two areas can be, they […]

Defining dead

Arya Shah Rochester, MN, USA   Park Point Trail The checklist of death was foreign to me when I first ran down its list. It’s hard to describe that encounter with death, but let’s see if I can convey the gist. It started on a bright summer morning. A boy woke up for a day […]

Is Daddy a good doctor?

Gregory W Rutecki Cleveland, Ohio   Tears at Calling Hours George Lundberg posed an intriguing question for a generation of physicians: why don’t more doctors go to the funerals or calling hours of their patients?1  In fact, he boldly predicted that the only funeral you can be sure your physician will attend will be that of […]