Tag Archives: neurology

Jules Dejerine

Jules Dejerine originated in Savoy and grew up in the then provincial atmosphere of Geneva, where his father was a carriage proprietor… Young Dejerine had a powerful physique. At the Lycée Calvin he was better known for his swimming and boxing then for his devotion to study…. Nevertheless, he did well in school…left for Paris […]

Multiple [disseminated] sclerosis

  “Disseminated sclerosis was described pathologically in the 1830s by Cruveilhier in Paris and Carswell in London, but clinical accounts were sketchy. It was known only to the cognoscenti and regarded as a great rarity. Charcot was the first to diagnose the disease during life, and from 1860 onwards Charcot and Vulpian, and later Charcot […]

Death from uremia

“Your grandmother is doomed,” [the doctor] said to me. “It is a stroke brought on by uremia. In itself, uremia is not necessarily fatal, but this case seems to me hopeless. I need not tell you that I hope I am mistaken.” [Then] there was a moment when the uremic trouble affected her eyes. For […]

Left-handedness: is it the winner’s curse?

Isuri Upeksha Wimalasiri Kandawela Estate, Ratmalana, Sri Lanka  (Fall 2017)   Writing left-handed Most human beings, some 85% to 95%, are right-handed, and the remainder consists mainly of left-handers and a negligibly small number of ambidextrous people. Hand orientation is decided during intrauterine life, but if a child shows hand preference before the age of eighteen […]

“I shouldn’t know you again if we did meet:” Prosopagnosia

Sylvia R. Karasu New York City, New York, United States (Fall 2017)   Figure 1. Chuck Close, Self-Portrait (1997) (Museum of Modern Art, New York City) Watching Black Narcissus, the eerily unsettling film1 about an order of nuns cloistered in an isolated, windswept convent perched within the Himalayas, I am struggling to differentiate one nun from […]

Classicism and Sir Charles Bell’s Engravings of the Nerves

Allister Neher Montreal, Quebec, Canada (Summer 2017)   Charles Bell, A Series of Engravings, Explaining the Course of the Nerves Readers of medical humanities journals have become accustomed to seeing articles on anatomical illustration and its indebtedness to the techniques and conventions of the fine arts. As diverse as connections between these two areas can […]

Pascal’s disease

Bo Laestadius Stockholm, Sweden (Winter 2016)   The French mathematician, physicist and philosopher Blaise Pascal was born in 1623. At the age of twelve he had already studied Euclid´s geometry on his own and had written a paper about sound waves. A few years later he designed and built a calculator. In mathematics he has […]

My First Medical Rotation

Shawn Khosla Rockhurst University, Kansas City, Missouri, United States (Winter 2013) Poet’s statement: My junior year in high school, I started to shadow a physician in an inner-city hospital. This poem illustrates my initial shock at the devastation caused by social evils like drugs and drunk driving. My experience showed me the importance of combining […]