Tag Archives: nephrology

A fatal and mysterious illness

Michael D. Shulman Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States      Scans, like  those above, showing reflux and stasis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with dialysis dementia prompted placement of a CSF shunt in at least one patient before intriguing new diagnostic clues emerged. In late 1972, a flurry of letters began to appear in the […]

Death from uremia

“Your grandmother is doomed,” [the doctor] said to me. “It is a stroke brought on by uremia. In itself, uremia is not necessarily fatal, but this case seems to me hopeless. I need not tell you that I hope I am mistaken.” [Then] there was a moment when the uremic trouble affected her eyes. For […]

Fifty years on an Englishman recalls Cook County Hospital

Simon Cohen University College London Hospitals   Cook County Hospital, Chicago, IL In 1968 I was a senior registrar at a London teaching hospital. My ambition was to become a staff member at a major London institution and at that time one of the requirements was a qualification known as the BTA (Been to America).  […]

Dr. Willem J. Kolff: a great man

In Memoriam Willem J. Kolff: A great man George DUNEA President and CEO, Hektoen Institute of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Medical Director, Chicago Dialysis Center, Founding Chairman Emeritus, Division of Nephrology, Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL (Spring 2015)   Willem Kolff, often called the father of the artificial […]

Nephrology in 10 Steps

Andrew S. Bomback New York, United States     Photography by COMSALUD 1 I was seeing patients in clinic the morning my daughter was born. My wife called me to say that her contractions, relatively weak and infrequent when I had left home a few hours earlier, had suddenly picked up. She asked how quickly […]

History of nephrology: beginnings

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Introduction In the second half of the 20th century nephrology became a fully-fledged specialty owing largely to the development of renal biopsy, dialysis, and kidney transplantation.1 Yet the seeds of these great advances were sown centuries earlier, based on the work and observations of scientists and clinicians dating […]

History of nephrology: the middle period

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Domenico Cotugno Coagulable urine Despite centuries of medical progress, the presence of abnormal amounts of albumin in the urine remains to this day the most sensitive and widely used indicator of renal disease. Described by Hippocrates as “bubbles on the surface of the urine” and known to medieval […]