Tag Archives: Fall 2012

Fish story

Tim Chapman  Chicago, Illinois, United States   You can get to know a person pretty well when you’re helping them wipe their ass. My name is Ernie Fischetti. I was named after “Mr. Cub,” Ernie Banks. I used to hate Charlie’s best friend was a guy they called “Mookie.” He always brought in orders for […]

The midwives of San Gimignano, 1336

Mary A. Osborne Chicago, Illinois, United States Before the story line for Alchemy’s Daughter flew into my imagination, the idea of writing historical fiction had not occurred to me. I had penned a number of short stories, often inspired by my experiences as a home care nurse, and two semiautobiographical novels that no publisher wanted. […]

The midwives of San Gimignano, 1336

Mary A. Osborne, BSN, RN SeniorBridge, Chicago, Illinois, United States Before the story line for Alchemy’s Daughter flew into my imagination, the idea of writing historical fiction had not occurred to me. I had penned a number of short stories, often inspired by my experiences as a home care nurse, and two semiautobiographical novels that […]

Apple Tree – Baby Poems

Jeanne Bryner, RN Cortland, Ohio, USA Poet’s statement: Working in pediatrics, I find children’s bodies/spirits revealed in nature and my art. A child’s presence brings light to a room and hope to our world.   Apple tree Here, in the backyard, beyond the clothesline where I hang my sheets, my eyes are drawn to the […]

The Montreal Children’s Hospital

Barry Pless Montreal, Canada   Montreal Children’s Hospital Hospitals are more than bricks and mortar. The Montreal Children’s Hospital (MCH) is no exception. Like all famous hospitals, there is little about the buildings themselves that warrant acclaim. It is the accomplishments and contributions of the staff that make them respected. Accordingly, this account focuses on […]

History of nephrology: beginnings

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Introduction In the second half of the 20th century nephrology became a fully-fledged specialty owing largely to the development of renal biopsy, dialysis, and kidney transplantation.1 Yet the seeds of these great advances were sown centuries earlier, based on the work and observations of scientists and clinicians dating […]

History of nephrology: the middle period

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States   Domenico Cotugno Coagulable urine Despite centuries of medical progress, the presence of abnormal amounts of albumin in the urine remains to this day the most sensitive and widely used indicator of renal disease. Described by Hippocrates as “bubbles on the surface of the urine” and known to medieval […]

Leaders in the development of Western obstetric practice

 The history of obstetrics contains too many notable figures to simply select six key leaders in its development. However, as Laura Kaplan notes in “Changes in Childbirth in the US,” featured in the current issue, modern obstetrics has been greatly influenced by the invention and modernization of the forceps (Chamberlen and Smellie), the introduction of […]

Forceps: a brief history

“He’s a little old man very pale of complexion / Into many things makes a narrow inspection / His head’s very long and his hand’s very small” are the mysterious lines that open an anonymous 17th century English poem.1 Often presumed to refer to Hugh Chamberlen the Elder—the last of the famous Huguenot immigrant family […]

Birth trays in the Italian Renaissance

Recurring outbreaks of plague and their resulting demographic catastrophes largely contributed to the Renaissance emphasis on family and procreation. After the initial epidemic in 1348, the plague returned more than a dozen times over the next two centuries. Childbirth was seen as a vital measure to combat plague’s devastation, and a woman’s most important duty […]