Tag Archives: Education

Beginnings of bedside teaching in Padua: Montanus

      “Medical historians seem to agree that the first teacher of medicine to instruct his students at the bedside was Giovanni Batista de Monte (1498-1552), better known by his Latin name of Montanus. In 1543 Montanus was appointed to the Chair of Medicine at the University of Padua, a state institution of the […]

Special abilities for a brave new world

Elida Melova The Republic of Macedonia   Miranda – The Tempest, 1916. John William Waterhouse, Oil on Canvas. London, Royal Academy, 1916, no. 52 “If you have integrity, nothing else matters. If you don’t have integrity, nothing else matters.” – Alan K. Simpson This quote has found its true home in education. Receiving a degree […]

Cultivating clinical compassion with cultural encounters

Jeffrey Lee Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States   Sunset along the beaches of Sant Antoni de Calonge The calm waves of the Mediterranean played a lullaby as I walked along the beach, the fine-grained sand gently caressing my toes. I noticed a small group of women massaging each other’s backs. I awkwardly watched them from the […]

Medical murder

Susan Jacob University of Newcastle, Australia (Summer 2014)   Archangel Michael reaching to save souls in purgatory, 17th century, Jacopo Vignali Medical murder or clinicide is defined by the psychiatrist Robert Kaplan as the “unnatural death of multiple patients in the course of treatment by a doctor.”1 Medical murder must be distinguished from euthanasia in that […]

Mrs. Collins and the Body Snatchers

Michael Ellman Chicago, Illinois, United States In the morning the Medicine Consultation Service clears patients so they can undergo surgery. Fees from the operating rooms are the cash cow that drives the hospital. We read the electrocardiograms and declare no ischemia, lower the blood sugar with quick acting insulin, treat the hypokalemia with 20 milli-equivalents […]

Clinical teaching

The early part of the student’s clinical career is always the most important. Every doctor knows that the initiation into clinical work is one of the most difficult intellectual and personal trials of the student’s career. The best help that the clinical teacher can give to his students during the early part of their career […]

On Longcope Rounds

 Kevin R. Fontaine Birmingham, Alabama, United States The Four Doctors, 1905 John Singer Sargent Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Dr. Hunter Champion keys the code in and enters the Longcope Office holding two plastic bags and a cardboard box with Dunkin’ Donuts coffee.  Senior resident Parker Ruhl, interns Ben McEnroy and Susan Quan, and third […]

Intercepted letters: the Wandervogel syndrome

Reprinted from The Lancet, Anonymous, “The Wandervogel syndrome,” 1411–1412, December 24, 1966, with permission from Elsevier. My dear Dean, You seemed surprised in Faculty when I raised objections against extended leave of absence for Johnson to act as visiting professor in Chile. I have been brooding about this business for some time, and here is […]

Teaching death

 Boris D. Veysman New Jersey, Piscataway, United States This story “Teaching Death” by Boris D. Veysman was originally published in Academic Medicine, 2005 Mar; Volume80(3):290.© 2005 Association of the American Medical Colleges Publication. “God! You chose me to watch over the life and death of your creatures. I now turn to my calling.” The Maimonides […]