Paradise Lost – John Milton

Adam and Eve touching the serpent in the tree of life

 

Before his final expulsion from paradise Adam was taken to the highest mountain in the garden, where the archangel Michael showed him what misery the future will bring to man:

two scenes with Adam and Eve. One leaving the garden, the other pleading with God

Immediately a place
Before his eyes appeared, sad, noisome, dark;
A lazar-house it seemed; wherein were laid
Numbers of all diseased; all maladies
Of ghastly spasm, or racking torture, qualms
Of heart-sick agony, all feverous kinds,
Convulsions, epilepsies, fierce catarrhs,
Intestine stone and ulcer, colick-pangs,
Demoniack phrenzy, moaping melancholy,
And moon-struck madness, pining atrophy,
Marasmus, and wide-wasting pestilence,
Dropsies, and asthmas, and joint-racking rheums.
Dire was the tossing, deep the groans; Despair
Tended the sick busiest from couch to couch;
And over them triumphant Death his dart
Shook, but delayed to strike, though oft invoked
With vows, as their chief good, and final hope…

 

two scenes with Adam and Eve. One leaving the garden, the other pleading with God

But is there yet no other way, besides these painful passages, how we may come to death? asks Adam.

There is, said Michael, if thou well observe

The rule of not too much; by temperance taught,
In what thou eatest and drinkest; seeking from thence
Due nourishment, not gluttonous delight,
Till many years over thy head return:
So mayest thou live; till, like ripe fruit, thou drop
Into thy mother’s lap; or be with ease
Gathered, nor harshly plucked; for death mature:
This is old age; but then, thou must outlive
Thy youth, thy strength, thy beauty; which will change
To withered, weak, and gray; thy senses then,
Obtuse, all taste of pleasure must forego,
To what thou hast; and, for the air of youth,
Hopeful and cheerful, in thy blood will reign
A melancholy damp of cold and dry
To weigh thy spirits down, and last consume
The balm of life.  To whom our Ancestor:
Henceforth I fly not death, nor would prolong
Life much; bent rather, how I may be quit,
Fairest and easiest, of this cumbrous charge;
Which I must keep till my appointed day
Of rendering up, and patiently attend
My dissolution.  Michael replied.
Nor love thy life, nor hate; but what thou livest
Live well; how long, or short, permit to Heaven.

Book XI

 

 

Photo Captions

Banner: The Fall of Man and the Expulsion from the Garden of Eden, Michelangelo, Sistine Chapel, Vatican City
Top: Expulsion from Paradise, Charles-Joseph Natoire, Metropolitan Museum of Art, NYBottom: Expulsion from Paradise, Masacchio, Branchassi chapel, Florence

All images are over one hundred years old and are in the public domain.

 


 

GEORGE DUNEA, Editor-in-Chief.

 

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