Nephrology | Hektoen International

Death from uremia

“Your grandmother is doomed,” [the doctor] said to me. “It is a stroke brought on by uremia. In itself, uremia is not necessarily fatal, but this case seems to me hopeless. I need not tell you that I hope I am mistaken.” [Then] there was a moment when the uremic trouble affected her eyes. For […]

Dr. Willem J. Kolff: a great man

In Memoriam Willem J. Kolff: A great man George DUNEA President and CEO, Hektoen Institute of Medicine, Professor of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago, Medical Director, Chicago Dialysis Center, Founding Chairman Emeritus, Division of Nephrology, Stroger Hospital of Cook County, Chicago, IL (Spring 2015)   Willem Kolff, often called the father of the artificial […]

The village uroscopist

Alexandru Gh. Sonoc Sibiu, Romania (Summer 2014)     The Village Physician David Teniers the Younger (1610-1690) Brukenthal National Museum, Sibiu, Romania   A physician sits in his studio at a table on which stand several covered vases. He has a book in his left hand and holds in his right hand a glass flask […]

Nephrology in 10 Steps

Andrew S. Bomback New York, United States (Spring 2015)     Photography by COMSALUD 1 I was seeing patients in clinic the morning my daughter was born. My wife called me to say that her contractions, relatively weak and infrequent when I had left home a few hours earlier, had suddenly picked up. She asked […]

History of nephrology: beginnings

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States (Fall 2012)   Introduction In the second half of the 20th century nephrology became a fully-fledged specialty owing largely to the development of renal biopsy, dialysis, and kidney transplantation.1 Yet the seeds of these great advances were sown centuries earlier, based on the work and observations of scientists and […]

History of nephrology: the middle period

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States (Fall 2012)   Domenico Cotugno Coagulable urine Despite centuries of medical progress, the presence of abnormal amounts of albumin in the urine remains to this day the most sensitive and widely used indicator of renal disease. Described by Hippocrates as “bubbles on the surface of the urine” and known […]

History of nephrology: modern era

George Dunea Chicago, Illinois, United States  (Fall 2012)   Twentieth century Three major developments—renal biopsy, dialysis, and transplantation—revolutionized nephrology in the second half of the 20th century. Renal biopsy transformed the diagnostic approach to renal disease from a clinical methodology to one based on morphological analysis. Presently over one million patients with renal failure are […]

Domenico Cotugno (1736-1822)

Domenico Cotugno During a period of over 40 years Domenico Cotugno served as professor of anatomy at the University of Naples, one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the world, founded by the Holy Roman Emperor Frederic II in 1224. His academic career was marked by several important advances for which he is […]

Richard Bright, the father of nephrology

Two centuries will soon have passed since Richard Bright, of Guy’s Hospital, London, described the disease that came to bear his name. Within a few years of his original publication, the term Bright’s Disease became virtually synonymous with kidney disease—in England, Germany, France, and the United States. In its full-blown formulation it consisted of four […]

How to acquire something external – Immanuel Kant on kidney-paired donation

Hansjörg Rothe Würzburg, Germany (Spring 2015)   Immanuel Kant Literature in its finest examples stands above time. When Shakespeare wrote Hamlet he could not foresee what our daily life would be like at the beginning of the twenty-first century. Neither could he have dreamt of all those technical innovations mankind would achieve in the 400 […]